10 Bible Verses Almost Nobody Notices

10 Bible Verses Almost Nobody Notices

Last week, I posted about 5 interesting, fun things about the Bible. You know how sometimes you’ll be reading the Bible and completely miss something really shocking or interesting? Next up in our semi-gnostic quest for secretive scriptural stuff: 10 Bible verses almost nobody notices. These are the verses (or short clusters of verses) people tend to gloss over when reading the Bible. They miss all the good stuff, but you won’t! Enjoy! Numbers 12:1, 10 – God’s not a fan of racism. Let’s take a look at what happened when Miriam and Aaron mouthed off to Moses. Numbers 12:1 tells us that they used Moses’s marriage as a pretext for attacking his authority. What was it they objected to about his marriage? He was married to a Cushite, that is, an Ethiopian. What you need to know about this story is that Ethiopians tend to be very dark-skinned. How did God punish Miriam? God came down to give everybody a talkin’-to, then He left: “The cloud also that was over the tabernacle departed: and behold Mariam appeared white as snow with a leprosy” (Numbers 12:10). It’s like God was saying, “Oh, you don’t like black, Miriam? Hey, is this white enough for ya?” Genesis 11:4 – Stealing the blessing. Noah’s son Shem was post-modern almost 5000 years before it was popular. An introduction to Noah’s family: “Here’s the cat. We call him Cat. Here’s the dog. We call him Dog. Here’s my eldest son. His name is Name.” Yep, that’s right. Shem means name. It does have significance, though: the builders of the Tower of Babel, descendents of...
5 Interesting, Forgotten Things About the Bible

5 Interesting, Forgotten Things About the Bible

As summer rolls on, I’m starting to prepare lessons for the coming academic year. Here are a few fun and interesting things most people either didn’t know or simply forgot about the Bible. Adam and Eve didn’t eat apples. Well, probably not, anyway. The reason tradition (lowercase ‘t’) tends to give us apples is that, in Latin, apple and evil can both look like the same word, malum. Check out the actual biblical account of Genesis 3. I doubt they ate the forbidden fruit and then, realizing they were naked, ran all over the garden looking for an apple tree just to accommodate a language that wouldn’t exist for at least many centuries. What’s more likely? The forbidden fruit was probably fig and our first parents covered themselves in fig leaves. Fig leaves are not only fashionable, they’re penitential – fig leaves contain latex, which has a tendency to make some people itch. Adam and Eve had a third son. If you didn’t know this, congratulations! You’re a typical Catholic. My recommendation: read the Bible more often, and don’t just skip the parts you think are boring. Plenty of people don’t know the Book of Genesis very well because they’ve written off the whole Torah (that’s the first 5 books). Don’t be like them. The Book of Genesis is a great read that really sets the stage for everything after it. Anyway, Adam and Eve had a third son and named him Seth. Many scholars believe Seth’s descendants are the “sons of God” in Genesis 6:2, who married the “daughters of men” (Cain’s descendants), thus corrupting the whole human...
Catholic Trivia: Who is Scipione Rebiba?

Catholic Trivia: Who is Scipione Rebiba?

Here’s a free Catholic trivia question for you, phrased several different ways you can ask your friends: Who is Scipione Rebiba? Which bishop can you find in the apostolic lineage of more than 5000 of the bishops alive today, including the pope? Who is the earliest bishop more than 90% of today’s bishops can definitively identify in their lineage? If you’ve never used Catholic-Hierarchy, you’ve been missing out. I use it frequently when I want to find out where a bishop is from. On its many pages, you’ll find the Syllabus of Heirs – as I call it – the long list of bishops and their apostolic lineages, that is, the line of bishops, each one ordained by the last, all the way back to the apostles. Get familiar enough with the site and you’ll begin to notice one name that haunts the pages like a ghost: Scipione Cardinal Rebiba. Scipione Cardinal Rebiba is the last traceable bishop in the lines of many of the world’s bishops, and there he appears on the bottom of almost all the apostolic lineages Catholic-Hierarchy catalogs, a reminder of days when record-keeping was not as important as it is considered today. You might ask, “what are the implications of this sudden stop in the apostolic lineage?” Because it is unknown who ordained our mystery man to the the episcopate, it is conceivable, at least to conspiracy theorists, that his ordination could have been invalid, thus invalidating the ordinations of all his episcopal descendants – those 90% or over 5000 I mentioned earlier, including the pope. That’s a mighty hefty concern! In order to...