Why Remembering Miscarriages Matters

Why Remembering Miscarriages Matters

Every life matters.  As a Catholic and a staunch pro-lifer, I believe this firmly. I always have. It’s why I worked for several years at a non-profit devoted to “saving the babies” and was part of the pro-life group in college. Each child is a gift from God, even if the circumstances of his conception are less than favorable. Every baby deserves to live, to be born, to love and be loved, to be remembered.  This isn’t just my opinion. It’s truth. Why then do we place such a taboo on speaking about miscarriage and infant loss? When a baby is created, it’s a new life. It should be celebrated, and it when all is going well, it usually is. We have baby showers and send gifts. We wait with joyful anticipation for that happy day to arrive.   But, when that happy day doesn’t arrive, when baby passes away and there is no bundle of joy to cuddle, quite often the talking stops. Coworkers don’t know what to say and the people at Mass aren’t quite sure of how to approach the issue of your dwindling belly, so they simply don’t. Sometimes, even we as parents hesitate to bring up these babies, named or otherwise, when asked how many children we have. Society tells us that life is about the here and now. YOLO, right? Anything that may diminish our immediate enjoyment should be shunned and eschewed from polite conversation. As Christians though, we know that, yes, we do only live once. The thing that we understand though that the world may never get is that our real...
Little pro-life victories

Little pro-life victories

About a year ago, I was prompted to write this post when I discovered a little bit of anti-child internet technology that catered to the opinion that kids are ridiculously expensive buzzkills. There is much reason for hope, though. Aside from the statistical data, there is lots of anecdotal evidence that people love kids, and that parents have a blast with them (or at least appreciate the odd things they do or say). Presenting just a few: Kid Snippets, where adults act out situations narrated by kids: Convos with My 2-Year-Old, a similar premise: Action Movie Kid, whose dad transforms home movies into pure awesomeness: (But while we’re on the subject of Star Wars, I might interject a more serious topic) Reasons My Son is Crying. This might be somewhat controversial since it presents kids who are obviously upset, but any parent can probably relate that the reasons for upset-edness can become supremely weird Cardboard Box Office: Parents recreate famous movie scenes using cardboard boxes and their infant son. If we can recapture (as these links do, I think) the sense that children are precious, we will go a long way to turning around the culture of death. Got any more? Post them in the comments! Enjoy those kiddos,...
Quick note: local pro-life victory

Quick note: local pro-life victory

Our Shreveport readers may be particularly interested in this, but others of a pro-life persuasion can cheer as well. I received the following email a few days ago from the local coordinator of our 40 Days for Life effort (links added by me): Abby Johnson called me last night and said that one of the workers from “Hope” [Medical Group in Shreveport, one of our two local abortion facilities] quit her job!  She apparently wrestled with it for a long time and finally couldn’t take it anymore.  She packed everything up and moved out of town.  For a while she was homeless, keeping her kids in her car while she looked for a job.  She contacted Abby’s ministry “And Then There Were None“.  They helped her and within days she had a place to live and a new job.  She was also asking Abby for moral support from the Shreveport area.  So please say a special prayer today for this woman and her family. Please find a way to get involved with 40 Days for Life. Whether it is praying in front of a clinic, praying for those who visit the clinic, or praying for those who work at the clinic, you can see the common...
“A difficult decision”

“A difficult decision”

Thanks to summer break I’ve been catching up on outdated reading materials, including many back issues of the National Catholic Register. I’ve seen several stories therein where pro-choice advocates argue that women face “difficult decisions” in whether or not to abort their babies. Unstated in most of these arguments is why the decision is difficult. It would seem that, as the product of sexual activity, the decision should be hardly difficult at all. After all, our culture has done a lot to demystify and desacralize the sexual act, making it not much more important or significant than playing ping-pong with someone. How can a trivial and recreational act so frequently lead to a situation with “very difficult circumstances?” Further, isn’t it odd that, faced with these “difficult decisions,” the pro-choice advocate always pushes for the women to have less information? To want the input of fewer people (like boyfriends, family members, crisis pregnancy centers, pray-ers outside of abortion clinics, or doctors who object to killing the baby)? In what other “difficult decisions” do we think it better for people to have less information or to have restricted contact with people before making the decision? We are constantly told that we need to engage a diversity of opinions, yet pro-choice advocates strenuously push for pregnant women to be close-minded and not to seek pro-life opinions about this “very difficult decision.” You receive more information in your credit card bill about the effects of late payments (“it will take you this long to pay off your balance, you will have paid this much in interest…”) than you do about the real effects of abortion from...
A Saint Among Us

A Saint Among Us

Recently, my family celebrated the fifth birthday of one of our little saints.  There was cake and soda, laughter and love and family.  We sang “Happy Birthday” for the fifth time to a little girl who passed away five days after her birth as her baby brother (who has never met her) blew out her candles.  We celebrated her short life because we know that, much as we miss her, she is taking part of that everlasting celebration of heaven.  We celebrated because we have faith. “There is no foot too small that it cannot leave an imprint on this world” — Annonymous Bernadette, the “brave bear”, was a fighter.  Her mother was told that her baby had a condition known as anencephaly less than halfway through her pregnancy.  This meant that, should her child survive to term she would most likely be stillborn or at best live a few hours.  She surprised us all and lived five full days.  In her short life, both in and outside of the womb, she managed to leave a lasting impression on all those who knew her and her parents.  Most who witnessed her parents’ unswerving faith in God’s mercy and love had one of two responses.  They were either in awe of it, as I was, or they were perplexed to the point of being incapable of accepting it, much less understanding it.  There were some whose rudeness in the face of something they did not understand was downright disgusting.  But her parents ignored them and continued to prayerfully, faithfully, walk the path God had set before them, not understanding why but knowing full well...