He laughs because he trusts

He laughs because he trusts

tossed and trusting

Andrew was playing with our babiest boy last night. At 7 months, he is too cute and sweet and just old enough to toss in the air for a burst of giggles. Andrew is 6’5″ with hands large and capable enough to make all our kids feel safe, especially our baby. And there he was, being rocked high and tossed in the air, all the while squealing with delight looking at Andrew and loving every second of it. I looked on with sentimentality hearing the musical laughter from my husband and son, but I couldn’t help the unnerved awe at the fact that our little one had incredible trust.  He laughed because never did it enter his mind that something bad might happen to him mid-air. The gravity of being tossed to free fall didn’t occur to him because his focus was on the face of his father. Andrew held our baby smiling and cooing, which was taken as happy reassurance that everything was great, so enjoy the ride.

Consider this Exhibit A in the case for Why We Should Go to Mass and Adoration.

There’s no such thing as a totally calm life, is there? I think we all have different amounts and forms of chaos regardless of our respective stages of life. There’s stress and turmoil, which seem to throw us in a dizzying whirl. Left to our own devices, we might look at the overwhelming Heap of Life and panic, breathless and desperate for the peace of having two feet planted firmly on the ground; but the prayerful soul laughs when tossed around, because like our son, he focuses on the face of his Father and trusts in His reassurance.

We’re blessed with being able to behold God in the Holy Eucharist, and not just that, but to receive Him. The God of the Universe loves us to profound and infinite proportions, and humbles Himself to a small piece of bread so that we might see and touch Him, to receive His grace and strength when we’re feeling thrown. There is no greater reassurance and there’s no one greater to trust.

 

This post originally appeared on The Catholic Wife.

1 Comment

  1. He laughed because never did it enter his mind that something bad might happen to him mid-air. The gravity of being tossed to free fall didn’t occur to him because his focus was on the face of his father.

    A footnote:

    My experience raising seven kids suggests (and I think behavioral science backs this up) that babies, like bigger people, actually enjoy, and find funny, things that are a little bit scary, but not too scary. (This enjoyment of stress in manageable levels is probably part of how we develop the resilience to deal with more stressful events.)

    I think sometimes when babies laugh at parents or siblings growling at them or pretending to eat them, etc., on some level they apprehend that this feels like menacing behavior, but isn’t seriously meant. Same thing with being thrown in the air, etc.

    It really is the same sort of thing, on its own level, as an older kid on a roller coaster: If it weren’t at least a little scary, it wouldn’t be fun. Of course if they get too scared it isn’t fun any more, but within tolerable levels I don’t think they feel no fear, but feel a manageable level of fear, and enjoy it.

    Not that this in any way negates the basic point you’re making about trust. It’s precisely the trust that keeps the fear manageable rather than overwhelming.