Bubblicious

Bubblicious

Bubbles: sometimes they’re good, sometimes they’re not so good. Double Bubble–eh, kind of good. If your friend has some Twix the DB is definitely getting traded. Bubbles the Chimp–odd, mostly for the company he kept. Gymboree Bubbles–superior quality; so resilient they can land on your fingernail and not pop. Housing bubble–not so good. Whatever happened to the TV shows about flipping houses? My college had its own bubble; a secular, progressive one where socialism and atheism were presumed to work wonderfully in the outside world despite a lack of supporting empirical evidence. But, to its credit, it did have a great frisbee golf course. As I wade into conversations about the election, I’m reminded that I’ve purposefully put myself into a bubble. You’d think my own experience as a very nominal Catholic would remind me that Catholics-in-name-only still exist in this world, but I get myself into conversations all the time with fellow Catholics who don’t seem to be too concerned about abortion or voting for a candidate who clearly wants to do nothing to reduce them. But, I can always retreat to my orthodox Catholic bubble, populated mostly by T&C folks and its fans. In this world, communion is usually received on the tongue, more concern is shown for the 3,000 unborn killed daily than for climate change or particular Streets to Occupy, the Pope is our Papa and not a raving outdated coot, our kids may drive us a little crazy but we love them and want more, and chastity has nothing to do with belts. We recognize that prayer is necessary for our spiritual lives; we...
How Angela Faddis’ Story Touched My Heart

How Angela Faddis’ Story Touched My Heart

We went to the same university and had a few mutual friends, but I never met Angela Faddis. One mutual friend of ours started posting updates on her condition a few months ago and I clicked, in curiosity, to see the Facebook page erected to support her. She was a faithful Catholic who, on Easter Sunday, 2011 with a sweet husband and 2 adorable small children, was diagnosed with Stage IV Colon Cancer. Upon the diagnosis she said, “Jesus still rose, so we will trust.” 15 months later, she passed away at the age of thirty two. Her husband would post status updates of things she was saying through her pain and discomfort that were nothing short of inspiring: I want people to know that no matter what, they must trust in Jesus. Even when I could not say the words, I knew I had to trust in Jesus and I would ask Chris to say the words with me. He held my hand and said, ‘Jesus, I trust in you.’ I youtube’d a few interviews with Chris and Angela Faddis and in one of them she talks about how they truly relied on the Divine Mercy Chaplet for strength even before this trial. From an outsider’s perspective, it seems like that was (and still is) the essence of their relationship: prayer and trust in God. What an inspiration to those of us called to the married life. The lesson I gleaned from the Faddis’ story is that everything (brace yourself for a massive, but true generalization) in life is a matter of perspective. Angela and Chris’ relationship with each...
10 Incredible & FREE Resources for Catechists

10 Incredible & FREE Resources for Catechists

As a teacher in one of the few high schools in the country to have fully embraced the iPad in the classroom, I’m pretty keen on using technology and the internet in the classroom. Here are some of the awesome resources I’ve discovered over the last few years: Websites: New Advent – What would we do without New Advent? Free and fast access to the Early Church Fathers, the Summa Theologica, and the Catholic Encyclopedia (the old one it offers for free is a better resource than the new one that costs $$$). Add to that the front page that keeps me and many others up-to-speed with the Catholic news. This should be in everyone Catholic’s top 5 bookmarks. Amazing Catechists – It’s filled to the brim with resources. Check it out. Catholic Icing – A lot of the things at Catholic Icing I can’t use in my classroom, but the website is worth a mention because it’s a great resource for Catholic moms and Asst. DREs like my wife, who put a lot of care and attention into PSR. Happy Saints – Recently featured on Catholic Icing, I had to share it. Happy Saints is a place for fun, free images of the saints to inspire young minds. St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology – Dr. Scott Hahn, along with some others, maintains this site.  It’s a treasure trove.  Seriously. Prezi [link fixed] – Powerpoints are a thing of the past.  Their crisp, clear format was cool back when I was in high school, where I was one of the gurus of the powerpoint suite among the student...
LOLz

LOLz

NOTE: We at T&C love the elderly members of the Church and recognize each as a special gift from God. Following in our tradition of pointing out humorous observation on the foibles of Catholic life, this post is intended as a humorous and intentionally over-generalizing article poking a little light-hearted fun at a group we hold close to our hearts. It is meant with all respect to our dearly beloved elderly Catholics – because, goodness knows, we young Catholics are too easy to joke about. Please do not read further if you lack a sense of humor or are otherwise a grump. I remember distinctly from my time at Steubenville one particular phrase used by Professor James Pauley: “Always hit up the LOLz.” “What?” Students asked. “The Little Old Ladies. They pray. A lot. Make them pray for you.” A recent conversation on the Facebook wall of a priest friend reminded me of this quote and the many types of LOLz I’ve encountered over the years. Why not make a catalog? Below, you’ll find an outline of several different categories of LOLz in the Church today. The Hat Lady – This particular LOL is as eccentric as the many hats she wears as she goes about her day, often taking care of church business in her own flighty way. Living in the moment, she often gets notions – whether from the Holy Spirit or from the slow creep of dementia – that she feels entirely free to share with whomever is standing nearby. It was a hat lady (not one suffering from dementia) who once told me, simply because...
Sex, Marriage, and the Holy Trinity

Sex, Marriage, and the Holy Trinity

In previous posts, I’ve pointed out how the Bible implies the Holy Trinity from the outset, where the beginning of Genesis speaks of God, His Spoken Word, and His Spirit (“wind,” in some translations). Likewise, I’ve discussed the concept of perichoresis – the indwelling of each Divine Person in the other two – as centrally important for understanding (as much as we feeble-minded humans can) how the Trinity can be both one and three. I thought I’d take things a step further and show how these realities in the Creator show up in His creation. Keeping in mind that the early chapters of Genesis set the stage for a reading centered on the Holy Trinity, we can expect the creation described to flesh out the concept a bit for us. Thus, we aren’t disappointed when we arrive at Genesis 1:26*: Then God said, “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness…” Immediately upon reading this, most are struck by the sudden use of the plural pronoun us, as opposed to God’s preferred I. The contrast becomes immediately apparent; only a few verses later (v. 29), God refers to Himself again in the singular I. More immediate, however, is the singular he in v. 27: Then God said, “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness…” So God created man in His own image, in the image of God He created him… Why would God use the plural and then the singular? Why would Moses, writing down this ancient story, do the same? Some have suggested that it is simply the “royal plural,” but I don’t...